Skip to content

Multicultural NSW
Census data notes

General data notes


The list of Local Government Areas for a specific Birthplace, Language, Ancestry or Religion is sorted by percentage of the total population of that LGA which the community makes up. This means that some quite small populations may appear in the top 10. All NSW LGAs data are shown on the map, however.

Ancestry, Birthplace, Language and Religion profiles have a selected cultural group defined as the community of interest, and other datasets are presented cross-classified by that community. The geographic area is the whole of New South Wales.

Local Government Area and Electoral division profiles have a defined geographic area (either an LGA or Electoral Division) as the community of interest and various data on the total population of this area are presented.

Population types


Enumerated Population

Enumerated population refers to the population counted in the area on Census night. Because it is impossible to catch everyone at home on one night, the Census counts people wherever they were sleeping that night. This might include people who usually live somewhere else but were staying in the area on business or holiday.

This type of count provides a snapshot at a given point in time. The Census is timed to capture the typical situation, however, holiday resort areas, such as the Gold Coast and snow fields, may show a large enumeration count compared with the number of people who usually live there.

Where enumerated population data is used in the profile, overseas visitors have been specifically excluded from the tables, but visitors from within Australia are included.

For detailed information about Enumerated population please refer to the ABS Fact Sheet on Population Measures.

Usual Residence Population

Usual Residence population refers to the population that usually lives in the area rather than the population that was counted there on Census night. Each person completing the Census is required to state their address of usual residence and this information is used to derive the Usual Residence population. To be counted as the usual residence, a person has to have lived or intend to live in the dwelling for six months or more of the year.

Usual residence counts are less likely to be influenced by seasonal factors, such as holiday seasons and snow seasons, and provide information about the usual residents of an area.

In 2011, 2006 and 2001 all Census data are provided for usual residence as well as enumerated population. Usual residence is the default output for data on individuals in profile.id, and most data from the ABS is published on a usual residence basis.

Information on households and dwellings in profile.id is only presented on an as enumerated basis, as usual resident counts are not available at the dwelling or household level. However, while they are referred to as enumeration counts, household characteristics are partially usual residence-based as they are determined with reference to up to three people recorded as temporarily absent on the form.

Additionally, data about usual residence for areas below the LGA level were not published for any data sets prior to 2001. Consequently, usual residence data are not available for the 1996 and 1991 Census years in profile.id, and to access these years, enumeration counts need to be selected.

For detailed information about Enumerated population please refer to the ABS Fact Sheet on Population Measures.

Specific Data Notes


Ancestry (Ancestry Communities of Interest)

Ancestry data are coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Cultural and Ethnic Groups (ASCCEG). Note that Ancestry is a multi-response question, so individuals can be counted in more than one Ancestry group.

The Ancestry groups presented in the “Ancestry” communities of interest section represent the most significant multicultural groups in NSW, as well as some smaller ones of particular interest. The ancestries selected here represent a response at the most detailed level of the classification, except for those listed below which are an aggregate of smaller categories.

Certain Ancestry categories used here include smaller categories. For instance, the category “Southern Asian” includes “Indian”, “Pakistani”, “Sinhalese” and a number of other smaller ancestry groups. Some of these are also counted in their own categories while others are included only in the larger combined category. Other categories which include broad regions with multiple ancestries include Central and West African, Carribbean Islander, Pacific Islander, Peoples of the Sudan, Southern and East African and Southern Asian.

For ancestries combined into a wider category, it is possible to have multiple responses within the same category. In this case such a person would only be counted once. For instance, someone with “Indian” and “Sri Lankan” ancestry would be counted only once in the “Southern Asian” category, but would also be counted separately in both the sub-categories.

There is an element of subjectivity to ancestry, which is not present in birthplace or language data. Ancestry can represent a person's understanding of their own affiliations, rather than any objective measure of genealogy. For this reason, changes in Ancestry numbers over time may represent a real-world change in the demographics, or may represent simply a change in people’s identification with a particular Ancestry group over time.

Note that some of the selected Ancestry categories in the “Ancestry” section of the site are slightly different to the abbreviated Ancestry classification used in other parts of the site, for example, for ranking Ancestries by Birthplace, Language or Local Government Area.

“American” ancestry excludes African American and Hispanic American.

The “Peoples of the Sudan” is an ancestry grouping in the Australian Standard Classification of Cultural and Ethnic Groups (ASCCEG) that includes “Sudanese”, “South Sudanese”, “Bari”, “Dinka”, “Nuer”, and “Darfurian”.Due to the changes in ancestry classifications between the 2006 and 2011 Census surveys, the “Peoples of the Sudan” profile provides more comparable information about the broad group of respondents who identify with Sudanese and associated ancestries than just the “Sudanese” or “South Sudanese” profiles alone.

People who wrote ‘Yugoslavia’ as their ancestry were in 2006 coded to ‘Serbian’ but in 2011 coded to ‘South Eastern Europe, nfd’. For the purposes of this profile, these two categories have been combined for both years.

Some Ancestry categories were only introduced to the Census in 2011, having previously been included in broader categories.

For these categories (and in some cases, the broader categories they were removed from), only 2011 data are available. This includes “Sudanese”, “South Sudanese”, “Fijian-Indian”, “Bangladeshi”, “Bengali” and “Sri Lankan Tamil”. It is not possible to derive accurate 2006 figures for these groups without combining into a larger category.

Ancestry (LGA and Electoral Division profiles)

Ancestry data are coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Cultural and Ethnic Groups (ASCCEG).

There is an element of subjectivity to ancestry, which is not present in birthplace or language data. Ancestry can represent a person's understanding of their own affiliations, rather than any objective measure of genealogy.

Please note that the version of Ancestry used in the LGA and Division profiles on this site is a slightly condensed version compared to the specific Ancestries used in the Ancestry communities of Interest section of the site. This was done to ensure that all categories had sufficient responses to produce meaningful output for areas much smaller than a state, and to ensure time series comparability between 2006 and 2011.

For this reason, many ancestry groups with small populations have been combined into wider regional categories, which don’t necessarily match ABS classifications.

'Other Oceanian' includes Solomon Islander, Ni-Vanuatu, New Caledonian, I-Kiribati, Nauruan and others

'Other Polynesian' includes Hawaiian, Niuean, Tahitian, Tuvaluan and Tokelauan.

'Other British' includes British, nfd, Manx, Channel Islander

'Other North-Western European' includes Flemish, Frisian, Northern European nfd, Icelandic and others

Other Southern/South East European' includes Basque, Roma/Gypsy, Montenegrin, Moldovan and others

'Other Eastern European' includes Belarusan, Eastern European nfd and others

'Other Arab peoples' includes Algerian, Kuwaiti, Libyan, Moroccan, Tunisian and others

'Sudanese' includes Sudanese, South Sudanese, Dinka, Nuer, Darfurian and others.

'Other Middle eastern peoples' includes Coptic, Mandaean and Berber.

'Other South East Asian' includes Balinese, Javanese, Sundanese and others.

'Other Northern Asian' includes Mongolian and Tibetan.

'Other Indian subcontinent' includes Burgher, Gujarati, Malayali, Bhutanese, Sikh, and others.

'Tamil' includes Tamil, nfd, Sri Lankan Tamil, Indian Tamil.

'Other Central Asian' includes Georgian, Kazakh, Pathan, Uzbek, Hazara and others.

'American' includes American and African American

'Other North American' includes Hispanic, Bermudan and others.

'Other South American' includes Bolivian, Ecuadorian, Guyanese, Venezuelan and Paraguayan.

'Other Central American' includes Nicaraguan, Costa Rican and others.

'Caribbean Islander' includes Jamaican, Cuban, Trinidadian and others.

'Central and West African' includes Ghanian, Nigerian, Liberian, Sierra Leonian, Senegalese, Congolese and others.

'Other Southern and East African' includes Kenyan, Oromo, Tanzanian, Ugandan, Zambian and others.

'Inadequately Described' includes 'African, so described', 'Asian, so described' and 'European, so described'.

Please note the following issues with specific ancestry groups:

'Serbian/Yugoslavian' includes "Serbian" and "South Eastern European, nfd", which contains primarily people who in 2011 stated their ancestry as "Yugoslavian". Previously these were coded to "Serbian", so the categories have been combined for comparability in 2011.

'Bengali/Bangladeshi' includes 'Bengali' and the new 2011 category 'Bangladeshi'. People who responded 'Bangladeshi' in 2006 were coded to 'Bengali' so the two categories have been combined for comparability in 2011.

'Sri Lankan/Sinhalese' includes 'Sri Lankan' and 'Sinhalese'. Sri Lankan ancestry is a new category for 2011, which was previously combined with Sinhalese so these two categories have been combined to make the category comparable over time.

Respondents can nominate up to two ancestries, and data are presented as multi-response. The numbers are a count of individual responses, but the percentages are expressed as a proportion of all people, meaning individuals can be counted twice in the table and percentages can add to more than 100%.

“American” includes “African-American” in this classification, but in the Ancestry community of interest for “American”, it specifically excludes African-Americans.

“Fijian” includes “Fijian-Indian” in this classification, but in the Ancestry communities of interest, these two categories are included separately.

Birthplace (Birthplace communities of interest)

Country of Birth is classified using the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (2011) (ABS Cat. No. 1269.0)

Only selected countries of birth are included as communities of interest. In general, language and ancestry are promoted via this site as being better representations of multicultural communities in NSW. However in some cases, specific birthplaces do provide a better measure of cultural affiliation than ancestry or language. This is due to a birthplace potentially having many different ancestries or languages, or representing multiple cultural groups.

For this reason, data for 12 birthplaces are presented here.

  • Bangladesh
  • Brazil
  • China
  • Egypt
  • Hong Kong
  • India
  • Iraq
  • Lebanon
  • Malaysia
  • Nepal
  • Pakistan
  • Sri Lanka

Birthplace (Other classifications)

Birthplace represents the country of birth of a person. It is likely to be highly correlated with Ancestry but many people with overseas ancestries were born in Australia.

The top 10 countries of birth for the selected area are shown in this table. The table is generated from a list of 125 birthplace which make up 99.2% of the overseas-born population of Australia. Please note that “Australia” is included in this list.

'United Kingdom' includes England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Channel Islands, Isle of Man, and 'United Kingdom not further defined'.

'Serbia/Montenegro (fmr Republic of Yugoslavia)' includes Serbia and Montenegro, as well as 'South Eastern Europe nfd' in 2011 and 2006. Those people categorised to South Eastern Europe were primarily those who stated their birthplace as Yugoslavia, which did not exist as a nation in 2006.

'China' excludes Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong.

'Sudan' includes South Sudan. South Sudan is a new country which declared independence in 2011 and was recorded in the 2011 Census. For comparison with 2006, data has been recombined for 2011 standard output.

'Main English speaking countries' includes Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

'Non-English speaking backgrounds' refers to persons born in countries not included in 'Main English speaking countries'.

For more information on this topic please refer to the ABS data quality statement on Country of Birth.

'Not Stated' includes 'Inadequately Described' and 'At sea'.

Language spoken at home (Language communities of interest)

Language spoken at home is coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Languages, 2011 (ABS Cat. No. 1267.0).

Language spoken at home is designed to measure 'first' or 'native' language, but it is self-responded, and migrants who have been in Australia for many years may speak English at home.

Languages in the Multicultural NSW profile have been selected to cover all the major language groups spoken in the state. 83 languages or groups of languages are available.

All persons, regardless of age, have a language recorded. However, a substantial proportion of babies are recorded as “Non-verbal”.

Language spoken at home excludes multi-lingual populations. E.g. If I speak English and French, but mainly speak English at home, the fact that I speak French is not captured. Each person can only appear in one language community of interest, though they may also appear in up to two Ancestry communities and a birthplace and religion community.

'Not stated' includes the category 'Inadequately described'.

Note that this classification of language is slightly different to the one used in the LGA, Birthplace and Ancestry profiles. Definitions for different groups are as follows:

‘Languages of the Philippines’ is included as a single group and includes Filipino, Tagalog, Bisaya, Cebuano, IIokano, Bikol, Ilonggo (Hiligaynon), and Pampangan.

Persian and Dari are included here as separate languages.

'Min Nan' was recorded in 2011 to represent the languages previously recorded as Hokkien and Teochew, correctly classifying these as a single language. For comparability, Hokkien and Teochew have been combined for 2006 comparison.

'Assyrian Neo Aramaic’ and ‘Chaldean Neo Aramaic’ were in 2006 a combined category ‘Assyrian’. In order to split these up, no 2006 data are presented.

‘Chinese, nfd’ includes all persons who wrote “Chinese” as their response, not a specific language.

Language spoken at home (Other language classification)

Language spoken at home is coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Languages, 2011 (ABS Cat. No. 1267.0).

Language spoken at home is designed to measure 'first' or 'native' language, but it is self-responded, and migrants who have been in Australia for many years may speak English at home. All persons, regardless of age, have a language recorded. However, a substantial proportion of babies are recorded as “Non-verbal”.

Languages in the LGA, Birthplace, Ancestry and Religion sections of the Multicultural NSW profile uses a slightly different classification to that used for the Language community of interest section. The condensed version still includes 99.2% of NSW non-English speakers, but more minor languages are included in an “Other” category, and for consistent time series from 2006 to 2011, certain languages have been combined.

Language spoken at home excludes multi-lingual populations. E.g. If I speak English and French, but mainly speak English at home, the fact that I speak French is not captured. Each person can only appear in one language community of interest, though they may also appear in up to two Ancestry communities and a birthplace and religion community.

The top 10 languages are shown provided they have more than 20 speakers. Use the “Show more” option to see the remainder of the list down to 0.1% of the population of interest. 'Not stated' includes the category 'Inadequately described'.

Some languages are not available for earlier Census years. Issues are as follows:

'Tagalog' includes Filipino, which was recorded as a separate language from Tagalog in the 2006 and 2011 Censuses, but no such distinction was made in earlier Censuses. Filipino is a standardised version of Tagalog, incorporating words from other indigenous languages within the Philippines.

'Persian' includes Dari, which was recorded as a separate language from Persian in the 2006 and 2011 Censuses, but no distinction was made in earlier Censuses. Dari is a localised name for Persian in Afghanistan.

'Min Nan' was recorded in 2011 to represent the languages previously recorded as Hokkien and Teochew, correctly classifying these as a single language. For comparability, Hokkien and Teochew have been combined in earlier Censuses.

'Assyrian/Aramaic' includes Assyrian, Chaldean and Aramaic languages, which were split up individually in the 2011 Census.

Religion (Communities of Interest)

Religion is coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Religious Groups (ASCRG), 2011.

The religion question in the Census is an optional question and so has a relatively high rate of 'Not Stated' responses. All persons are included in the religion classification. ‘No Religion’ is a valid response.

In the Multicultural NSW profile, data are presented on 47 significant religious groups, including ‘No Religion’. All these groups are comparable between 2006 and 2011. 'No Religion' includes 'No Religion (not further described)', Atheism, Humanism, Rationalism and Agnosticism. These are valid additional responses which condense into the No Religion category.

‘Australian Aboriginal Traditional Religions’ includes a range of traditional religious beliefs practiced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

Please note that a response of a particular religion does not necessarily imply anything about strength of belief or frequency of worship.

In the 2001 to 2011 period there has been a strong trend towards people responding “Jedi” or “Jedi Knight” to the religion question. In 2011 over 58,000 people used this response Australia-wide. This response is not a valid religion and is coded to ‘Non Classifiable religious belief”. This is not one of the selected profiled groupings in Multicultural NSW.

Religion (Other classifications)

The religion question in the Census is an optional question and so has a relatively high rate of 'Not Stated' responses. All persons are included in the religion classification. ‘No Religion’ is a valid response.

The top 10 religious groupings are shown for the specific community or LGA, with “Show more” being used to see the remainder of the list, down to 0.1% of population or 20 people, whichever is larger.

The classification used for religion in the LGA, Birthplace, Language and Ancestry profiles is different to that used to classifiy specific religious communities for the Religion profile. This is a condensed version with 46 religious groupings, designed to accommodate change in the religion classification over time and ensure that each category has enough people in it to provide a meaningful total at the Local Government Area level. The following aggregates are used here:

'Other Eastern Catholic' includes Melkite, Ukrainian and Chaldean Catholic.

'Other Oriental Orthodox' includes Syrian and Ethiopian Orthodox churches.

'Assyrian Apostolic' includes the Assyrian and Ancient Churches of the East.

'Other Eastern Orthodox' includes Antiochian, Romanian, Ukrainian Orthodox.

'Other Protestant includes Born Again Christian, Congregational, Evangelical Churches, Wesleyan Methodist Church and others.

'Other Christian' includes Ratana (Maori), Quakers, Christian Science, Gnostic Christians, New Apostolic Church and Temple Society.

'Christian, not further described' includes written responses of 'Christian'(no denomination specified), Apostolic Church, Church of God.

'Other Nature Religions' includes Animism, Druidism, Pantheism.

'Chinese and Japanese Religions' includes Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto and Ancestor Veneration.

'Other Non-Christian Religions' includes Scientology, Rastafarianism, Jainism, Theosophy, Satanism and Zoroastrianism.

'No Religion' includes 'No Religion (not further described)', Atheism, Humanism, Rationalism and Agnosticism. These are valid additional responses which condense into the No Religion category.

In the 2001 to 2011 period there has been a strong trend towards people responding “Jedi” or “Jedi Knight” to the religion question. In 2011 over 58,000 people used this response Australia-wide. This response is not a valid religion and is coded to ‘Non Classifiable religious belief”. Also included in this category is any other non-recognised religion or self-identified grouping.

Year of arrival in Australia

Year of arrival data are based on the Census question 'In what year did the person first arrive in Australia to live here for one year or more?'

The population for this topic includes only those people born outside Australia. For a Birthplace community of interest, this is the entire population, for Ancestry, Language or Religion based communities this will be a subset of the total population.

People born in Australia and those who didn’t state a country of birth are excluded.

The data are displayed in decade groupings, corresponding to Census years. The last 2 periods are 5-year periods.

The benchmark is the total overseas-born population of New South Wales.

Note that only 2011 data are presented for this topic, as time-series is inherent in the question, and categories are not comparable over time due to changing years.

For more information on this topic, please see the ABS data quality statement for Year of Arrival.

Proficiency in English

English proficiency aims to measure the ability of persons who speak English as a Second Language to also speak English.

For language based multicultural communities, this topic will include the whole population and does not have a category for “Speaks English only”. For communities defined by Birthplace, Ancestry or Religion, the category “Speaks English Only” is included – but technically the proficiency in English question only applies to those who speak a language other than English at home.

Responses to the question on Proficiency in English in the Census are subjective. For example, one respondent may consider that a response of 'Well' is appropriate if they can communicate well enough to do the shopping, while another respondent may consider such a response appropriate only for people who can hold a social conversation. Proficiency in English should be considered as an indicator of a person's ability to speak English and not a definitive measure of this ability.

For more information on proficiency in English, please refer to the Proficiency in English data quality statement on the ABS website.

Five year age groups

Five year age groups provide equal age cohorts enabling direct comparison between all ages without distortion.

For all communities, this topic includes all persons except 'Overseas Visitors'.

If an answer to the Age question is not provided, the Australian Bureau of Statistics imputes the age of the respondent, so there is no "Not stated" category for this variable.

For more information on the data quality of Age, please refer to the Age data quality statement on the ABS website.

Qualifications

Derived from the Census question 'What is the level of the highest qualification the person has completed?'

This topic includes all persons aged 15 years and over in the selected community of interest. It relates to the level of the highest qualification achieved excluding school-based qualifications, as of Census day.

Qualification levels are presented in descending order (of educational and time requirements), with university qualifications being the highest, and “No qualification” the lowest.

To be included, qualifications must be within scope of the question – that is, recognised by or equivalent to a qualification by an Australian university or tertiary institution. A wide range of overseas qualifications is recognised in the Census, and this does not necessarily imply that they will be recognised by Australian employers.

‘Vocational’ includes all Certificate level qualifications, usually associated with trades. Note that it is not always necessary to have completed year 12 to obtain a Certificate level qualification, so the total of those with non-school qualifications should not be taken as the number of people who have completed year 12.

For more information see the ABS Data Quality Statement for Non-school Qualification: Level of Education.

Education institution attending

This topic is derived from the Census question 'What type of educational institution is the person attending?'

This topic applies to all persons in the selected community of interest.

'TAFE' refers to Technical and Further Education institutions.

'Tertiary education' is usually taken to mean University and TAFE education.

'Not Attending' indicates that question 25 was not applicable because the person answered 'No' to question 24, which asks whether the person was attending an educational institution.

'Not stated' indicates that the person either did not state whether or not they were a student, or did not state what institution they were attending (or both).

Results for this question are closely linked to the age structure of the population concerned. So low attendance at school may not mean poor educational outcomes, it may simply mean that the population is predominantly older or younger than school age.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the data quality statement for Type of Educational Institution Attending on the ABS website.

Labour force status

This topic includes persons in the selected community of interest who are aged 15 years and over, and assesses employment in the week prior to the Census.

It is actually derived from 5 Census questions (34, 35, 44, 46 and 47), which look at whether the respondent had a job, if not, whether they were looking for work, and if they were looking for work whether they were able to start in the past week.

To classify full or part-time work, the question on hours worked is also used.

'Employed full time' means having worked 35 hours or more in all jobs.

'Employed part time' means having worked less than 35 hours in all jobs.

Please note that the full or part-time status refers only to the week before Census, not to a ‘usual’ number of hours.

The 'Labour force' is all persons aged 15 years and over who are either employed or looking for work and available to start. Both full and part-time work counts towards the labour force.

The percentages in the first table, showing employed and unemployed, are expressed as a percentage of those who are in the labour force.

The ‘Unemployment Rate’ is defined as the number of unemployed persons (looking for work and available to start) as a percentage of the labour force. The unemployment rate is marked in brackets next to the row to which it relates.

The ‘Participation Rate’ is defined as the labour force expressed as a percentage of the total population aged 15+. The participation rate is marked in brackets next to the row to which it relates in the second labour force status table. Please note that as some persons in Census don’t state their labour force status, this participation is not directly comparable to one derived from the monthly labour force survey.

All labour force data are a snapshot as of Census date.

For more information please refer to the data quality statement for Labour Force Status on the ABS website.

Occupations

This topic describes the occupations of employed people who were employed in the week prior to the Census.

Derived from the Census questions:

  • ‘In the main job held last week, what was the person's occupation?'
  • ‘What are the main tasks that the person himself/herself usually performs in that occupation?'

It includes only persons aged 15 years and over in the selected community of interest (cultural or geographic), who were employed in the week prior to Census. People who are unemployed or not in the labour force do not have an occupation category.

Data for occupation are coded using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) . The occupation classification categorises occupations broadly based on skill level and educational qualifications required. Only the broadest level of the classification (1-digit level) is presented here.

The occupation classification is updated periodically to take account of emerging occupation groups and changes to the structure of the labour force. The most recent change was in 2006.

For more information on this topic please refer to the data quality statement for Occupation on the ABS website.

Household income

Please note that for these household topics we still need to ensure all the “Refers to:” boxes emphasise that this is a count of people in private dwellings, not a count of households.

Household income data presents the total weekly incomes of all persons over the age of 15 in the household. Income collected is gross, the total of all wages, government benefits, pensions, allowances, investment income etc.

This topic counts people in the selected community of interest, who are counted in private dwellings on Census night.

Where households contain more than one individual from a particular community of interest, that household’s income will be counted more than once in the table.

All household topics on the Multicultural NSW profile are based on place of enumeration, and exclude those counted in Non-Private dwellings such as hotels, nursing homes, hospitals and prisons.

Excludes 'Other non-classifiable households'.

Only 2011 data are presented for this topic as income ranges are altered every five years to adjust for inflation and wages growth so comparison over time is not possible.

The not stated component for household incomes is high for most population groups, as a household income is considered not stated when any one individual in the household has a not stated income.

As individual income is collected in ranges, in order to calculate household income, a dollar value has to be imputed by the ABS to each range, then the individual incomes are aggregated, and output into ranges again. There is an inherent uncertainty in this process, so household incomes should only be treated as a guide to the income level in an area, not an exact calculation. For more information on income imputation, please see the ABS Fact Sheet – Income in the Census.

For more information on this topic, please see the ABS data quality statement on Total Household Income (HIND).

Household type

Household type, or household composition describes the type of family and non-family households within a dwelling.

It is a derived variable which looks at the relationships within a household, to define a household type for the total household, based on the primary family or non-family reference person in that household.

For the Multicultural NSW profile, the household type topic counts all persons by a cultural characteristic, by the household type of the household in which they were counted. If there is more than one person from the same cultural background (birthplace/language/ancestry/religion) in the household, that household will be counted more than once in the table.

All household topics on the Multicultural NSW profile are based on place of enumeration, and exclude those counted in Non-Private dwellings such as hotels, nursing homes, hospitals and prisons.

'A household' is a group of people living in a private dwelling making shared provision for meals.

'A family' is a group of people living in a private dwelling who are related by blood or marriage (including de-facto marriage and same-sex couples).

'Other families' includes any household of related individuals where a parent-child or couple relationship does not exist (e.g. siblings, uncle/nephew, and grandparent-grandchild).

Households may contain up to three families each with a different family composition. Family households in this table are classified into broad family type by the family composition of the primary family only. This significantly simplifies the reading of the table. Multiple family households make up a very small proportion of all households (less than 2% nationwide) so this simplification is expected to have negligible effect on the output.

'Group household' includes any household consisting of two or more unrelated individuals.

'Other not classifiable' households consist mainly of dwellings which the Census Collector believes were occupied on Census night but from which no form was returned. A small proportion of households in this category are those where only children aged under 15 were present on Census night (no adults). Because households where no form was returned have no information about birthplace, language, religion or ancestry recorded for individuals, the number of people in this category is negligible for most communities of interest.

Same sex couple families are included in this table but not separately identified.

For more information on household and family type, please refer to the data quality statements for Household Composition and Family Composition on the ABS website.

Household size

This topic counts households by the number of persons usually resident on Census night.

It includes occupied private dwellings with at least one resident home on Census night.

Household sizes are calculated based on all persons in the dwelling, either at home on Census night, or up to 3 people recorded as temporarily absent. The table counts people, by their particular cultural background/birthplace/language etc. but they are classified by the total number of people in the household of any cultural background. Households with only one person of the selected cultural background in them will only be counted once in the table, but may appear in any household size column, depending on others in the household. Households with more than one person of the selected background will be counted more than once in the table.

Visitors to a dwelling on Census night are counted in the table, which counts persons, but excluded from the calculation of household size.

Households where the entire household was absent on Census night are excluded - the dwelling is either unoccupied or has visitors only.

For more information on this topic please see the ABS data quality statement on Number of Persons Usually Resident.